Halloween Laughing Yoga Saturday

Come celebrate Halloween with me Saturday for Laughing Yoga. Wear a costume if you want. I’m going to try out some Halloween themed exercises and help you end your week and start your Halloween weekend with some laughter. Starts 10:30 EDT Saturday on Zoom, so you don’t have to worry about the weather. Link below.Continue reading “Halloween Laughing Yoga Saturday”

Start your weekend refreshed

Stressed? Depressed? Feeling isolated or alone? Start your weekend with something that’s good for mind, body and spirit. Laughter Yoga Exercise. First public Saturday Laughter Yoga class is tomorrow at 10:30 a.m. Eastern. Shoji Bridge Saturday Laughter YogaTime: Aug 7, 2021 10:30 AM America/Kentucky/Louisville Join Zoom Meetinghttps://us02web.zoom.us/j/84503613645?pwd=S3h5YWFjZzVKQU0rTW9iRFE1RGx0dz09 Meeting ID: 845 0361 3645Passcode: 535816

Laughter Yoga is here!! Starts tomorrow.

Here’s what people have been saying about laughter yoga with Shoji Bridge. “I started out feeling so disconnected this morning after a particularly tough week. Now I can smile and go on with a much lightened attitude.” “I didn’t realize how much I have missed genuine laughter this last year, especially with friends. What aContinue reading “Laughter Yoga is here!! Starts tomorrow.”

Start a laughter yoga practice with me

The old adage states that laughter is the best medicine, and the benefit of laughter yoga exercise is that your body doesn’t know the difference between genuine laughter and self-simulated laughter. You can gain all the same holistic benefits without having to feel funny. Ask me how to join in when classes start in ONEContinue reading “Start a laughter yoga practice with me”

Laughing makes us feel good

Laughter exercises can be done in a chair and do not require much physical movement or poses to be effective, so most anyone of any ability can participate and benefit. Incorporating deep breathing with self-simulated belly laughs provides benefits of aerobic exercise in a gentle, no-impact way. Free community classes start next week via Zoom.Continue reading “Laughing makes us feel good”

Longterm Care, Part 2: Assisted Living

I’m wrapping up my birthday month growing old and aging series with the second part of my three-part series on longterm care options for the aging and elderly in society. Today we look at Assisted Living. Assisted Living Facilities (ALF) are growing in popularity with about 1/2 a million aging adults choosing this option inContinue reading “Longterm Care, Part 2: Assisted Living”

Longterm Care, Part 1: Aging in Place

It’s what most of us wish for: to age in place in our homes. But the reality is that staying in our home or in the home of a family-member is unrealistic without around the clock care and that care is unattainable for most of us. According to HealthyAging.org, more than 80% of people will need assistance with some Activities of Daily Living (ADL) as they age. These activities include hygiene, such as bathing, oral health, as well as dressing, eating, mobility and maintaining continence – being able to get to a bathroom, get off and on a toilet safely and cleaning one’s self after using the toilet.

Aging and Healthcare: A worsening crisis

The elderly and aging in our community deserve to access the care they need to continue to pursue their individual happiness and participate in the lifestyles, hobbies and activities they value until the end on their lives. Our institutions throughout society must shift the way we do things to remove barriers in healthcare for our aging populations. Doing so will improve the lives of us all.

Ageism in Healthcare

We should consider it a blessing if we are able to grow old before we die. There is no shame in being old and continuing to live on this earth and to share the resources, richness, and rights of a living being in our communities. Neglecting our elder population and putting them away out of sight will not stop us from getting old or dying any more than talking about aging and death will cause them. If we can begin to address our fear of death, the terror of or mortality, we can come to love our lives, ourselves, our bodies and everyone else’s, too.

Why should you care about eldercare?

It’s time we all start to pay attention to the way our society’s needs and culture will and is shifting. Offering alternatives to those of us who have aging family members was a driving force in my decision to become a departure doula and to offer elder care. Our healthcare system, especially after COVID, cannot handle the increased need, consumption, of our aging population today, and it’s only going to get more difficult in the coming decades. While changes and policies need to address our overwhelmed, overly complicated and inadequate healthcare system, we should also begin to look to non-medical professionals to help fill many of the gaps in the system.